Bail In Barbados – Did You Know?

jailIn Barbados, a person charged with an offence or convicted of an offence is entitled to bail, subject to the Bail Act Cap. 122A (“the Act”). The fundamental test in determining whether to grant bail is whether the accused will return to court for the determination of the matter. The Court also takes into account other factors when exercising its power to grant bail or not to grant bail.

According to Section 5 (2) of the Act, the Court must take into consideration relevant factors including the following:

(a) “the nature and seriousness of the offence or default, and the probable method of dealing with the defendant for it;

(b) the character, antecedents, associations and community ties of the defendant;

(c) the defendant’s record as respects the fulfilment of his obligations under previous grants of bail;

(d) the strength of the evidence of his having committed the offence or having defaulted, except where the defendant’s case is adjourned for inquiries or a report; and

(e) the length of time the defendant would spend in custody if the court were to exercise the power conferred on it by section 218A of the Magistrate’s Courts Act” (power to remand the defendant in custody).

According to Section 5 (1) of the Act, the Court may refuse to grant an accused person bail if it believes that the accused person would fail to surrender to custody; reoffend or interfere with witnesses. Further, the Court may not grant bail if it is satisfied that the accused should be kept in custody for his own protection; for the protection of the community or if he is a child or young person, for his own welfare. The Court may also deny to grant bail to a person who is charged with an offence alleged to have been committed while on bail.

The Court may grant bail with conditions. The Court may, before releasing the defendant, require him to provide a surety to ensure his surrender to custody. Further, the Court may require a defendant to surrender his passport, report to a police station on appointed days and at appointed times, order the defendant to comply with any requirement to ensure that: the defendant surrenders to custody, does not commit an offence while on bail, does not interfere with witnesses or otherwise obstruct the course of justice or, makes himself available for the purpose of enabling inquiries or a report of any medical examination to be made to assist the court in dealing with him for the offence. If a defendant who is on bail fails to surrender to custody, the Court may issue a warrant for his arrest.

It is important to note that a magistrate does not have the power to grant bail to a person accused of murder, treason, high treason or an indictable offence under the Firearms Act. A person accused of the above offences may only be granted bail by a High Court Judge.

Where bail is denied, the defendant may reapply for bail at the Magistrate’s Court and may also apply for bail at the High Court. If the Court does not grant bail to a person who has been charged with an offence punishable by imprisonment, the accused person will be remanded until the determination of his case or until bail is subsequently applied for and granted.

                                                                                                                                            -Kara-Je Kellman

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